Allergy and intolerance in infants with reflux

Adverse reactions to food can be categorised into IgE mediated reactions and non-IgE mediated reactions. Understanding the difference between the two is important as the approach to treatment is quite different. An IgE-mediated food reaction involves the immune system. The onset is sudden and includes vomiting, abdominal pain, urticaria and angio-edema. An IgE-mediated reaction to food can be diagnosed through a range of validated tests including skin prick testing.

Children’s Books Available for Borrowing from RISA Library

As our children grow older and continue to experience food allergies and/or complications from reflux such as tube feeding, it can be hard for them to understand why they are different. There are a number of children’s books that have been written about food allergies, eosinophilic oesophagitis (EE) and feeding tubes. RISA Inc has been able to source some of these books and they are available to borrow for free from our library (for Australian RISA members).

Trudi, Samuel, Millie, Patrick and Jorja’s story

Samuel projectiled his first ‘milk’ breastfeed onto the wall. I didn’t know what was happening but soon got used to the constant vomiting. He had several apnoeas in the first week, and began screaming. As a first time mother, I had no idea what had hit me. Sam thankfully slept most nights from sheer exhaustion but I struggled with the idea of routine; going out was difficult and I had extra cleaning as well.

We tried positioning/rocking, diet (off dairy but not soy), chiropractors, GPs, paediatricians and medications. I also joined a reflux support group. Sam improved dramatically at around twelve months; however, he still vomits and gags easily, gets car sick and dislikes milk products and raw vegetables/salads (tickling feeling in throat).