Advocacy – making things better for our kids

So if you’re a reflux parent you know how few people understand what you’re going through. And that includes medical professionals – not just your relatives and friends. That’s why RISA exists, right?

While the prevalence of GORD in the general infant population runs somewhere between ten and 20 percent(1), the incidence among premature infants is significantly higher ‐ recent studies suggest around 90%!(2) Perhaps unsurprisingly, the incidence among the general infant population is not dissimilar to the incidence among the general adult population.

Kids reflux – the facts and the stats

Did you know:

1. Reflux affects up to 8% of children and a higher % of infants
2. Some estimates put it as high as 1 in 5 babies
3. It is estimated that 65‐85% of premmie babies suffer with GORD
4. In 2005 there were 259,800 births in Australia
5. Over 34,000 babies are likely to suffer with reflux in Australia
each year

Spread the word and help a reflux mum

Are you a ridiculously busy reflux mum who believes in RISA but doesn’t have much time on your hands? You can still help. Here’s how: Forward our newsletter or link to our website to people who might have a new baby. Remember about 10% of bubs are likely to be suffering from reflux. It’s not that uncommon. Tell a midwife or a nurse. Do you have any health professionals in your circle of friends and family? Tell them about your experiences & RISA. Forward them our newsletter or a link to our website. Like us on Facebook. It takes a second.

Bel and Jude’s story

I had a pretty normal pregnancy with Jude, ate everything I should stayed away from everything that was warned about. No drinking, smoking raw meat, eggs, cold meats, salad bars takeaway. The list goes on. I didn’t die my hair and I didn’t use chemicals to clean. Why am I telling you this? Just in case there is another reflux mum reading this, It is nothing you did. I did everything right and at 3 years old my son still suffers from silent reflux.

Bianca and Oliver’s story

My name is Bianca and I have one child, Oliver; he is 1 year old. Oliver was diagnosed with silent reflux at 4 months of age by one of my closest friends, who happens to be our GP. Thank god for her. She witnessed one of Oliver’s screaming fits; these used to happen most days, sometimes a few times a day and go on for what felt like hours, but was probably 30 to 60 minutes of screaming and crying before my husband or I would be able to settle him and/or he would fall asleep from exhaustion.

Tanya and Rachael’s story

We didn’t have a failure to thrive (FTT) baby, or a baby who needed to be hospitalised, however the first twelve months with our first child Rachael were the most difficult in my life. As everyone said parenting was hard, I just thought that it was normal to never be able to put your child down without them screaming, to scream inconsolably for hours and hours and to only sleep upright.

Trudi, Samuel, Millie, Patrick and Jorja’s story

Samuel projectiled his first ‘milk’ breastfeed onto the wall. I didn’t know what was happening but soon got used to the constant vomiting. He had several apnoeas in the first week, and began screaming. As a first time mother, I had no idea what had hit me. Sam thankfully slept most nights from sheer exhaustion but I struggled with the idea of routine; going out was difficult and I had extra cleaning as well.

We tried positioning/rocking, diet (off dairy but not soy), chiropractors, GPs, paediatricians and medications. I also joined a reflux support group. Sam improved dramatically at around twelve months; however, he still vomits and gags easily, gets car sick and dislikes milk products and raw vegetables/salads (tickling feeling in throat).

Jody, Dylan and Cate’s story

Cate was born when Dylan was just 15 months old. Cate screamed and screamed. She comfort fed so much (in between the screaming and not sleeping) and was so on/ off my breasts that they used to bleed all over her face while I was trying to feed her. I thought I had an attachment problem so hired a lactation consultant who tried so hard to help me, and when in sheer frustration (and with people telling me it was my milk and to bottle feed) I weaned her at 4 weeks.